Absolute pitch question?

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Leo
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Absolute pitch question?

Postby Leo » Tue Apr 11, 2006 1:27 pm

When a person is born with perfect pitch, do they know the name of the notes also in thier minds. Or do they learn the name? How do they find out they have perfect pitch.

If they learn the note name, how is it discovered they have it?

Or when they hear a song on the radio as a kid do they say "Do you hear that D E G A B F pattern"

Or do they walk up to the piano repeat a song from radio note for note.

Are they having to learn theory like everyone else?

Maybe my expectations are too high, what can I expect to gain. I don't mean this as a slam. I am just wondering.

I compose music now, I already hear music in my head. I mean orignal compositions. Is absolute and relative pitch what I need.

:oops: :shock:

KosciaK
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Re: Absolute pitch question?

Postby KosciaK » Tue Apr 11, 2006 3:27 pm

Leo wrote:When a person is born with perfect pitch, do they know the name of the notes also in thier minds. Or do they learn the name?
Are they having to learn theory like everyone else?


First question: In Western music we have 12 tones, equally tempered and the reference note is A = 440Hz. It could be A around 420 (like in the past) or it could be more then 12 tones in octave (like in turkish, arabic, indian music systems), or not equally tempered.

Second question: Theory is like gramatic in language. You know how all the parts of the language works, how to understand the sentence and how to make new ones that are 100% gramtically correct even if you know nothing about gramatic rules. It just helps you to describe things. Gramatics comes from language, not the other way around. The same is with music theory - you can name the things that are already going on, theory makes you more consious how it works.

aruffo
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Postby aruffo » Tue Apr 11, 2006 4:40 pm

Oh! I think you've just given me the next topic for the main page. I don't know if I've ever yet summarized how I believe absolute pitch is learned (in its various flavors and forms). KosciaK has a good start.. I should be able to expand on that.

Leo
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Postby Leo » Wed Apr 12, 2006 9:24 am

:?: KosciaK thanks, I think :shock:
This reply will require me to sponge for a while (absorb the meaning). :oops: I can tell this is a much deeper subject.

aruffo This is excellent to hear...
I think you've just given me the next topic for the main page.

KosciaK
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Postby KosciaK » Wed Apr 12, 2006 10:59 am

English is not my native language so sometimes when I can't find proper words I overcomplicate things....

Learning the tones - how would one now which music system is used in the music culture? In arabic music they've got 53 (if I remember correctly) tones in octave with completely different names. It's just a matter of categorizing and structurizing the sounds we hear.

Learning theory - I've just realised that I've probabely answered to different question then you ask. We should define what we mean by "learning the theory". Is it a) lerning to perceive the music correctly inside the music culture, music system or b) learning the knowlege that tries to describe what is going on.
For example in India the music system is different then Western one - there's no harmony as we understand it. The same with classical turkish or arabic music. Some contemporary classical music also has different theory - no tonality for example.
Mr John A. Sloboda (I've mention his book somewhere on the forum) claims that there are some rules that are universal for music in general, the rest must be learned. Merely the same as with the languages. That's why it's hard to unerstand jazz for metal fan or some atonal compositions for Mozart lover.
He claims that musicians' and non-musicaly trained persons minds work using the same mechanisms. The only difference is that musicians are able to consiously name what they hear - give labels.

Leo
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Postby Leo » Wed Apr 12, 2006 12:11 pm

KosciaK, I had a feeling you were in another country, your name of course isn't a traditional US name like john, bob hahahahaha :) Sorry to state the obvious, I'm sure you knew that :P I did notice the typing of words; however you're far from not making sense.

This reply was cut short as something more pressing arose. So to continue...

KosciaK, you bring up some interesting points. A person in thier native tongue pick up on the language.

lorelei
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Postby lorelei » Mon Mar 22, 2010 7:50 am

mostly kids with AP notice they have AP because:
-someone else notices they can name notes they hear (e.g. they comment when someone sings out of tune or transposes)
-they notice other people can't do it
usually they are very surprised that nobody else can name notes they hear, because they couldn't imagine things being any other way

lorelei
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Postby lorelei » Fri Mar 26, 2010 2:28 pm

by the way, an interesting point about AP:
apparently for many non-AP people, if everything was transposed to eg. C major, they wouldn't hear the difference. However, for someone with AP, this would be very unsettling- and boring. Key is an important characteristic of each piece, and if every piece was written in the same key, it would be weird. Is what I said above about non-AP people correct? If it is, I can only imagine what it would be like...
and yes I have to learn theory but it's easier I imagine. You learn intervals by listening to the notes and deducing the space between them, e.g. you hear an A4 and a B4. Only after that do you realize that the interval is a major second, instead of how people normally do it. With practice, this process becomes nearly instantaneous. Also, stuff like analysis is easier, because things like finding out "what key is this in" isn't a problem. Plus it helps in dictation :)


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