Real music AS APA

Talk about what you've discovered by using ETC-- and post your high ranks!
Space
Posts: 177
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 5:54 am
Location: Cincinnati, OH

Real music AS APA

Postby Space » Tue May 28, 2013 12:02 am

So I was listening to this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=p ... gdyIHHnbBM after a session where I play through 5 avenues of APA on the current single pitch, and then 5 avenues with random pitches while my 24 measure groove that cycles through all keys on groovebuilder runs in the background. Then, I do 100 notes or so with the two notes I've got so far (I started over so I could work entirely with the circle of fifths progression in the background through the whole thing).

What I found is that after working with those two pitches I was pretty much able to hear in the same basic fashion while listening to this tune. When I set my focus on "G", I hear all the Gs pop out in the piano lines and when I focus on "C", I hear all the Cs.

Interesting stuff.

Also, the clarity of the perception of the 'chroma' of the two pitches is awesome.

cjhealey
Posts: 114
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2007 10:35 am

Postby cjhealey » Tue Oct 08, 2013 5:13 pm

I think the main problem with APA is that it doesn't use tonal/musical examples... Therefore you never learn to properly differentiate between the Chroma and the scale degree in different situations.

So even if you've mastered the note "c" in APA, if you're listening to a piece in say F, the dominant scale degree function is going to overwhelm any awareness of the chroma you might have, and you'll probably just think that the tonic is C or something.

Space
Posts: 177
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2006 5:54 am
Location: Cincinnati, OH

Postby Space » Tue Oct 08, 2013 10:50 pm

Hey man, that's exactly what I've been saying for years not only about APA, but AP training in general. I feel that it is attending to the interference of tonal sensation that seems to be most lacking in AP training programs.

Some of the musical examples in APA, especially in the last handful of avenues for each pitch are melodic and as expected, do tend to throw the listener off more than just the chords and their arpeggiated forms.

There needs to be more of that, though. I suggested adding 2, 3, and maybe even 4 chord cadences to up the anty even more in the later avenues of each pitch in addition to expanding the library of melodic examples taken from real music.

I also think that IDing random pitches with programs like Pitch Player or Prolobe is indispensable, not to mention IDing pitches with looping chord progressions (like I do in groovebuilder) in the background, and eventually actual songs.

IDing pitches with a song playing in the background that maintains a consistent strong tonal center is a great bridge to experiencing direct musical use of your eartraining efforts. If you can lock on to and ID the random pitches in a separate program while the song is playing in the background, you should be able to then shift your focus to notes within the song itself and be able to begin IDing those notes too.


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