chroma in real music

Comments and questions about AP Avenue.
Axeman
Posts: 151
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 4:20 pm
Location: New Zealand

chroma in real music

Postby Axeman » Tue Feb 24, 2009 6:37 pm

I have been trying an experiement lately. After playing a few rounds of APA I put on some classical music in the same key as the game I have been playing. It is very easy to hear the key note throughout the whole piece. I have been playing this way today using Brahms intermezzo in A. Also after considering Chris' comments on the research site
The process of categorical learning remains the same when transferred to musical tones-- you don't learn the concept of A-flat by comparing A-flats to G's, B's, F-sharps, or any of an infinite variety of sounds, and figuring out which properties belong to each; you learn A-flat solely by synthesizing your various experiences of A-flats.
I thought I would try to simulate some minor variations in pitch by adjusting the pitch of the concerto on some editing software. I increased and decreased the pitch of the piece by increments of 2, 3, and 4 %. I then played the files one after another and listened for the A notes. It is interesting to note how your ear adjusts itself to the slight changes. At around 5% the piece no longer is in A and you can't pick out the A's but up 'til then the A's kind of still sound like A's and still jump out at you.
After listening to the files and playing the APA game I went down the road to an appointment. ON my way back a truck horn sounded an A and I thought 'that's A'. It was a low pitched A but was easy to hear and I wasn't even trying to listen for it.
Any way I'm going to continue this type of listening for a while and post my results later.

Sleeper
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Dec 05, 2008 10:30 am

Re: chroma in real music

Postby Sleeper » Wed Feb 25, 2009 10:31 pm

Axeman wrote:I increased and decreased the pitch of the piece by increments of 2, 3, and 4 %. I then played the files one after another and listened for the A notes. It is interesting to note how your ear adjusts itself to the slight changes. At around 5% the piece no longer is in A


Literally!

You go up a half-step by 2^(1/12) = 1.05946...

So, going up 5.946..% would have you in A# exactly.

Even 3% is closer to A# than it is to A.

The "just noticeable difference" is about 7 cents, and works out to a pitch shift of about 0.4%.

Axeman
Posts: 151
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 4:20 pm
Location: New Zealand

Postby Axeman » Thu Feb 26, 2009 12:43 am

Yeah I know. I'm not sure if the pitch shifter was exactly a % shift or just a speeding up of the track. The chromatic tuner on my computer shows roughly the notes are about 30 or so cents out at a shift of 2%. Of course it is out of tune but that was my reason for doing it. I wanted to give my ear the experience of a range of frequencies for the note being listend for. I have already cut out the 3% and above changes. Nevertheless the piece at the correct pitch is still a close parallel to the APA melodies and chords because once your ear is cued into the note to listen for after playing APA it is just like playing the game only you are not painting eggs just hearing the notes jump out at you while being in context.


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