some wild and crazy ideas

Comments and questions about AP Avenue.
KosciaK
Posts: 227
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 8:45 am

Postby KosciaK » Fri Jan 20, 2006 4:15 am

Hello!

From my observations how I get through APB I think that developing AP is about remembering sounds. In the first step you have to learn to hear chroma. You learn this chroma so you don't have to use blue buttons all the time. Then you learn chunks/segments of sounds. Intervals - in the beginning it's "Oh that's the familiar G with other note". Then in three note chords it's "Oh! That's that interval I know with extra note" and so on with more complex contexts. If you have learned this sound you know there's a certain note inside and a feedback happens. You know it's there so it's easier to hear it because you have expected it.
What makes me think so?
- On the Blue when there's lots of blue missiles in a row it's hard to hear clearly C but I still can give correct answer. Not because I've heard C but because I just knew there's C inside.
- When doing the launch code it's much easier to hear the target note in the sound on which you've made an error. Just because you know there must be a target note inside and you learn the whole sound. When this sound comes later in the game you still have problems with hearing the target note but you know (because you have this sound in your short term memory) there must be target note inside. You compare it with blue buttons to be 100% sure and after checking it's much easier to really hear the target note.
- Sounds with both C and G. Sometimes it's hard to hear both of them clearly at the same time. Many times after lots of blue missiles I can clearly hear G inside a chord but I'm asked if there's C. I can't clearly hear C but I just know there must be a C (because this chord sounds so familiar). After playing this chord in my head, expecting C I can hear it. Now after a week or so of training back on Blue Cadet and Warrior I start to observe the opposite thing. I can clearly hear C (because there were lots of red missiles before) and I just know there's G.

Greetings!
KosciaK

lorelei
Posts: 221
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:36 am

Postby lorelei » Mon Mar 22, 2010 7:57 am

Having AP isn't about comparing notes, and t's not a matter of memorization. U know how if u see a color u can say "that's red" or "it's green"? that's the way someone with AP can say, "it's a G#". They just know, and don't compare to other pitches. An A sounds different from a G.
They can also say what key anything is in, and they know just by listening.

Nikolaus
Posts: 53
Joined: Mon Nov 10, 2008 4:39 pm
Location: Dallas

Postby Nikolaus » Sat Oct 09, 2010 2:45 am

I remember reading in an atonal sight-singing book called "Modus Novus" that apparently passive absolute pitchers oftentimes have trouble sight-singing atonal melodies at first. Kinda interesting. Also a few people who have used the MT method on the Prolobe forum have mentioned how when listening to serial music pitches and chords jumped out at them, whereas normally in tonal music this is seldom the case. There was a study done awhile back in which certain test subjects were asked to memorize strings of random numbers. At first they couldn't manage at all, but after awhile their minds began to automatically devise a whole host of mnemonic devises in order to remember the sequences -- to make order of the disorder so to speak. By the time the study was concluded two months later, the subjects were able to recollect a good sixty or seventy numbers after one hearing. I think that when we train our ears with atonal drills, our brains learn to grasp those patterns more effectively and efficiently. However, since the structure of tonal music is dictated by a different set of rules (just ask any computer programmer who is involved in creating music using genetic algorithms), then such music remains out of grasp for them. Or, it could simply be that serial music is simpler and therefore easier to grasp.

RockofStrength
Posts: 31
Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:55 am

Postby RockofStrength » Sun Oct 10, 2010 4:50 pm

There was a study done awhile back in which certain test subjects were asked to memorize strings of random numbers. At first they couldn't manage at all, but after awhile their minds began to automatically devise a whole host of mnemonic devises in order to remember the sequences -- to make order of the disorder so to speak. By the time the study was concluded two months later, the subjects were able to recollect a good sixty or seventy numbers after one hearing.


Nikolaus-
This study is fascinating! I want to find an app to try it myself.

Clearie
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Oct 14, 2010 8:55 pm

Postby Clearie » Thu Oct 14, 2010 9:16 pm

[quote="aruffo"]To some extent, I must agree. Little children are not taught to read by finding the letter C in "SDLKCKLDK", but in Cat and Cup.
[quote]

I see the point, but the analogy is a little off. Recognizing a note in chords and small sequences would be just like learning the letter C in Cat and Cup. Teaching children to read by finding the letter C in "SDLKCKLDK" would be more like trying to get someone to recognize a note over a crowd of vuvulezas ; )

RockofStrength
Posts: 31
Joined: Thu Jan 07, 2010 11:55 am

Postby RockofStrength » Fri Oct 15, 2010 6:52 pm

I found the type of app I wanted. http://www.tokenarcade.com/play-666-Memflex.html The best I've done so far is level 8.

lorelei
Posts: 221
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:36 am

Postby lorelei » Sun Oct 31, 2010 8:36 pm

I remember reading in an atonal sight-singing book called "Modus Novus" that apparently passive absolute pitchers oftentimes have trouble sight-singing atonal melodies at first.

I've read that too. In fact, I will be using that book in my theory class later this year.


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