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Thoughts and responses regarding the research at acousticlearning.com.
Akaratcht
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2013 5:39 am

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Postby Akaratcht » Sun Aug 18, 2013 1:42 am

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Last edited by Akaratcht on Sun Dec 21, 2014 3:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

lorelei
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Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:36 am

Postby lorelei » Sun Aug 18, 2013 11:58 am

Very interesting thoughts. I hope I understood what you had to say correctly- so you learn how to base everything around this home note then, A or C, and relate everything to that?

Akaratcht
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2013 5:39 am

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Postby Akaratcht » Mon Aug 19, 2013 3:19 am

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Last edited by Akaratcht on Sun Dec 21, 2014 3:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

lorelei
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Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:36 am

Postby lorelei » Sat Aug 24, 2013 5:24 pm

So it does sound like you're essentially learning the locus and feel of 1 or 2 notes here... As you said, absolute relative pitch. It's a very useful skill and you can do a lot of things with it. You can identify notes when heard and in context.
I'd like to argue that "true," spontaneously developed AP does differ from this though, in the thought process anyway. At least in my own experience, all the different notes have different meanings, as different colors do to you :) I don't relate them to each other in order to figure out what they are. They just are what they are. With talking to other AP friends of mine, the same holds true for them.
This is not to say that perfect relative pitch is not a valuable skill, because it is. It can also be more flexible- if a choir drifts flat or sharp or you had to sing in a different key, the APer has to consciously work around that. In my humble opinion, these are somewhat different skills is all.
Kudos to you for learning and teaching the skills you do though!


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