revised colour chart for notes

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SunFishSeven
Posts: 37
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 12:18 am

revised colour chart for notes

Postby SunFishSeven » Fri Dec 24, 2010 10:14 pm

I have been looking for a long time at connecting colour with pitch class

Fletcher connects seven colours with the notes A B C D E F G, progressing through the colour wheel ( roughly ) and half colours the remaining notes. so C# would be half red and half orange iirc

ultimately ( and I am pretty sure I can argue this one into the ground as I have made the effort to understand the underlying theory ) this is not going to give the best representation

a better representation would be to place the 12 pitch classes present on a piano keyboard around in a circle of fifths C G D ... F C again, and map a variant of the colour wheel onto it

now this makes sense on a trite level
but it also makes sense when you look at

this way modulation represents movement around the wheel. so Gb would be the same colour as F#, but you would know from which direction in the wheel you're approaching it, so if you want to sing in Pythagorean tuning there is no obstacle

it's a far more intelligent system

http://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/chordwheel-pro/id406836326?mt=8#

this is a little app I have just finished coding up for the iPhone, which should give some idea.

moving further it make sense to map a phoneme pair to each note

I have put up a basic working system athttp://www.toneme.org ( apologies because it is very messy, I haven't touched it for ages )

I floated it on one of the forums here several months back, and it got scoffed. but the more I look at it and why progress on my own journey towards musical understanding, the more it continues to make increasing sense.

I'm creating a 12 tone colour and phoneme standard, calling this standard the 'toneme' standard

if anyone can offer modifications/improvements please do! I think setting C to red is pretty much universally accepted. but I don't know of any scheme in existence that moves around the colour wheel in fifths. and this is really important.

Pi

theandresanchez
Posts: 23
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:30 pm

Postby theandresanchez » Wed Dec 29, 2010 3:05 pm

I'm fairly confident that associating pitch to phoneme is a poor idea. There is nothing you can accomplish with this that cannot be more effectively and efficiently accomplished with conventional melody triggers, which themselves are nothing but a short term mnemonic crutch.

SunFishSeven
Posts: 37
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2010 12:18 am

Postby SunFishSeven » Wed Dec 29, 2010 4:34 pm

can anyone direct me to a good link regarding melody triggers?

Has anyone experienced the result of this technique?

Has anyone here managed to train themselves to perfect pitch? If so, I would like to hear what paths were taken...

theandresanchez
Posts: 23
Joined: Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:30 pm

Postby theandresanchez » Wed Dec 29, 2010 5:32 pm

SunFishSeven wrote:can anyone direct me to a good link regarding melody triggers?


http://www.pitchpaths.com/

It is also mentioned in aruffo's research. The basic idea is that any normal person can recall to a reasonable degree of accuracy the starting pitch of their favourite songs.

I think it's quite likely that young kids develop perfect pitch through consistent nursery rhymes and other similar triggers that allow them to start making other associations.


Has anyone experienced the result of this technique?


It works, kind of. Aruffo has a little program:


PC: http://www.aruffo.com/eartraining/files ... neTest.zip
Mac: http://www.aruffo.com/eartraining/files ... eTestX.zip

What aruffo himself says about it:

"For example, I tried out "melody triggers" with this widget a while ago (here's a Mac version) and in a startlingly short period of time I could name notes flawlessly. Even now, I can still use this widget to name notes with perfect accuracy, at a speed rivaling or exceeding that of Miyazaki's absolute listeners (1988). But whenever the melody association falters, I can listen to a note repeatedly and be utterly unable to answer, my mind a blank. Without a melody, I haven't the slightest clue, because there are no other clues. All I learn from this process is how to associate tones with melodies; I didn't (and won't) learn to recognize the tones. All note-naming training methods to date have provided clever workarounds to help you successfully pass a naming test, but what you really learn is the workaround, not the notes' identities. An adult who wishes to learn genuine absolute pitch must dedicate themselves to a training task which cannot be accomplished except by using genuine absolute pitch skill. That task must be structured to teach absolute pitch the way it's actually learned, not through some clever pretense. To acquire full absolute pitch at any age, a musician must discover and practice a style of musicianship that not only uses perfect pitch, but will fail without it."


Has anyone here managed to train themselves to perfect pitch? If so, I would like to hear what paths were taken...


That depends on your definition of perfect pitch.

Mark
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 7:47 am
Location: Asheville, NC

The correlation of color and sound

Postby Mark » Thu Nov 10, 2011 7:51 am

Check out www.virtuosoism.com to learn about the science of color and sound.


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