Either people speak poorly or i am going deaf :-S

Anything that's nothing to do with music.
cjhealey
Posts: 114
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2007 10:35 am

Either people speak poorly or i am going deaf :-S

Postby cjhealey » Thu Jul 12, 2007 2:43 am

I've noticed lateley - and it has nothing to do with APB i'm sure - but sometimes i am having trouble clearly decifering what others are saying. It isn't that i don't 'hear' them it is that i just fail to seperate one word from the next.

There was one occasion where i asked an individual to repeat what he said 4 times and i still couldn't work out what he said. Others seemed to hear him alright but to me it was like one long word and i couldn't for the life of me individualise the sections of it.

It's like some saying 'One and only love' as 'onenonlyove'

I seem to be having this same problem quite a lot lately and i can't work out why.
There are also just as many people who on the other hand i seem to never have a problem with.

It is especially the case when i don't understand one of the words being said.

At the end of the day i am sure that i'm not going deaf as i'm not one of your typical people who have music blaring and loud as it physically hurts when i hear loud noises/music.

But then, either there is something going wrong cognitivley or people are just genuinely lousy speakers - which is probably very likely as i have never had this problem when speaking to teachers.

However, i am not going to rule out a cognitive fault as lately i have been having quite a few of what people call 'blonde' moments.

For example, today i asked "Is that the three-fifteen bell?" when i meant "Is that the quarter-to-three bell?" and i didn't realise i had done it even after repeating the question twice.
Another problem is memory lapses: Words and phrase i should know i often can't seem to grasp.

A prime example to day was i couldn't remember what you called a 'suit of armour'!

I don't know what these things indicate but it is not a healthy thing to be happening in a 17year old!

It is quite frustrating also because this is an important 10 weeks for me and most of these results will be the ones that determine my O.P or SAT's as it is called in america. I can't really afford to be on a path to 'burnout' mode!

Sigh... This has really wandered away from the topic so i'll leave it there
Chris :-)

aruffo
Site Admin
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Location: Evanston, IL

Postby aruffo » Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:38 am

That's definitely curious-- and alarming. Keep us posted.. there might be something in it.

paul-donnelly
Posts: 83
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 7:27 pm

Postby paul-donnelly » Sat Jul 14, 2007 3:43 pm

Sometimes I do the same thing when I'm speaking to a person I'm not completely comfortable with. It's like my brain is less willing to go "oh, that's what they must have meant" for fear of slipping up.

petew83
Posts: 268
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2005 6:55 pm

Postby petew83 » Mon Jul 16, 2007 9:57 am

You will find that with extensive musical ear-training you get better at hearing the 'tone' of the voice (and the emotion behind it), but maybe a little worse at literal verbal comprehension. It's because your focus has been shifted. The now-richer tones hold new cognitive stimulus that will necessarily detract some of your attention away from the literal words, which were in the past your only source of information.

cjhealey
Posts: 114
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2007 10:35 am

Postby cjhealey » Sun Jul 22, 2007 2:02 am

I haven't had it in a while and like i said, i don't think it has anything directly to do with APB - what pete83 said sounds quite plausible though...

Sometimes I do the same thing when I'm speaking to a person I'm not completely comfortable with. It's like my brain is less willing to go "oh, that's what they must have meant" for fear of slipping up.

This also sounds plausible...

I don't think I am going deaf - although i was genuinely worried to begin with - as i can still hear the occasional supersonic sound emitting from an electical device which most people, even those around my age, can't or don't.

It was put to practical use some months ago actually... I walked into a class at the end of a less which i had been absent from for whatever reason (i can't remember what) to see what i had missed and waited for everyone else to leave.
Anyway, the first thing i noticed was a faint, very high pitched hum, and asked him if they'd been watching a movie or something. He asked how i knew and i told him "If i'm not mistaken, the TV is still on" he went and opened the cupboard it was locked away in (unable to be seen) and found that it was indeed still turned on. :-)

Anyway, it is intresting this problem i have/had as it does make one wonder how we know and are able to seperate and make words distinct when they are spoken quickly.

In fact, when we talk our words do flow into the next but for some reason (do or die type reasons i'd imagine) we have learnt to distinguish the beggining and end of a word.

This i think does pertain to perfect pitch as the lingual aspect i am sure translates across to perfect pitch which really is just an abstract form of communication.

Chris :-)

lorelei
Posts: 221
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 7:36 am

Postby lorelei » Thu Apr 07, 2011 6:17 pm

you get better at hearing the 'tone' of the voice (and the emotion behind it), but maybe a little worse at literal verbal comprehension.

In fact, I have noticed that if someone is ranting at me or something, I can just try to listen to the pitch of their voice and ignore what they are saying. It works pretty well.

aruffo
Site Admin
Posts: 1684
Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 12:09 pm
Location: Evanston, IL

Postby aruffo » Thu Apr 07, 2011 8:00 pm

Hm.. interestingly enough, now that I think about it, this might be comparable in a parallel way to how I judge acting performances.. I ignore the auditory signal completely and watch the bodies' involvement and reactions.


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