Chord Symbols

Comments and questions about Chordhopper.
Stefan
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 9:29 pm

Chord Symbols

Postby Stefan » Fri Jan 14, 2011 9:14 pm

Hey Chris, just started playing this game and I am a bit confused with the pictures you use for the chords, would it not be more productive to use the actual chord symbols in standard musical notation instead of the funny pictures, I understand the concept behind using the pictures that relate to the fixed do solfege but the other pictures in this game are just making it harder to learn the chords it seems...

aruffo
Site Admin
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Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 12:09 pm
Location: Evanston, IL

Postby aruffo » Sat Jan 15, 2011 1:36 am

"Standard musical notation" represents multiple conceptual and physical realities that do not exist in this game. Think about everything that must be understood-- seriously, everything-- before "standard notation" can actually make any sense at all. Then think of what must be understood before one black dot can be recognized as different from another black dot that's a millimeter higher and offset slightly to the right in relation to a black dot directly below it, and why that is not the same as another black dot that stands by itself in apparently the same relative position but with an extra little squiggle next to it. And consider how to solve the problem of establishing a relative visual anchor so that these dots, in different visual positions on a screen, can be recognized as same or different in relative position. Then add to all that the fact that any visual representation of a sound is necessarily and definitively arbitrary.

This game is meant to teach what these chords sound like. Theoretically, it should be easier to conceptualize each chord as a unique entity if its visual association is itself conceptually distinct. But my point is-- for this, and for the icons of Interval Loader, and for the colors of We Hear and Play-- that the purpose of training is to learn the sounds. If you've truly learned the sounds, then decoding them on an instrument should follow (you can "find" the chord because you know what sound you're looking for) and, then, it is the set of decoded components-- not the chord itself-- that is represented by "standard notation". Until the components are decoded and understood as a structural relationship, standard notation is unmeaningful.

At least, that's the theory behind why the game uses colored icons instead of black dots.

Stefan
Posts: 123
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 9:29 pm

Postby Stefan » Sat Jan 15, 2011 1:02 pm

Okay well that makes some sense, thanks Chris, I will give chord hopper a go.


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