Chordhopper listening strategies

Comments and questions about Chordhopper.
TS
Posts: 168
Joined: Sun May 07, 2006 4:58 am

Chordhopper listening strategies

Postby TS » Sat Oct 21, 2006 3:53 pm

Chris explained on the front page how he uses the middle F to recognize the chords, and that left me wondering, because my strategy doesn't seem to employ listening to single pitches very much, if at all.
I first identify if the chord is a I, IV or V and then if the chord is high, middle or low. Diamond, marble and cone are low chords, tulip, butterfly and tomato are middle chords, and basketball, fish and pepper are high chords.
I recognize the 7th chords straight away because they sound different, and to get the inversion I think of the badge as being the marble + an extra tone, the flower being the butterfly + an extra tone, the drop being the 7th chord with a high piercing sound, and the trousers is the one that doesn't fit any other category. (These are the icons before the different shapes. From the updates topic I noticed that things have changed a little.)

My starting distance is 24m, so with this strategy I'm able to identify the chords pretty well, but I have trouble with single tones. If the tones that are asked belong to the C-major scale, then I do quite well, but as soon as the black-key tones come in, I lose the feeling of the C-major key. Sometimes I hear a tone and know that it's a perfect fifth or a major second higher or lower than the last one, so I can count the icons and get it right.
When I passed the last few superfly challenges I just clicked randomly in the single tone query, because after a couple of tones I was totally lost.

Am I missing something with my strategy?

aruffo
Site Admin
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Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 12:09 pm
Location: Evanston, IL

Postby aruffo » Sat Oct 21, 2006 8:28 pm

I don't think you're missing anything. As you can see from the sheer quantity of chords, the goal of the system is to keep pushing your limit until your "high/low" strategy no longer works as effectively as a pitch-based strategy.

aruffo
Site Admin
Posts: 1696
Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 12:09 pm
Location: Evanston, IL

Postby aruffo » Sat Oct 21, 2006 11:28 pm

Conjunctively, Absolute Pitch Blaster should continue to develop your pitch sense so that a pitch-based strategy becomes easier and more effective than a high/low strategy.

Andi
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 1:39 pm
Location: Austria

Postby Andi » Sun Oct 22, 2006 1:50 pm

I use the same strategy as TS (startig distance only 14 m so far). When I've mastered the very first chord of a session - which is of course the hardest because there has been no reference so far - I can pretty rush through the game and it is always clear to me if its C, F or G. Sometimes I make one or two mistakes when I get the hight (eg. inversion) of a chord wrong.

With the single-tones its a bit more tricky. The first one here is the easiest because my mind is set to the key of C - it's like in IL. The next tone is most of the time no problem either. But afterwards it most of the time is working with relative pitch. The funny thing here is, that I have to imagine the first tone on the fretboard of a guitar to find the second one. So in real-life this tactic would be far to slow.

aruffo
Site Admin
Posts: 1696
Joined: Tue Dec 14, 2004 12:09 pm
Location: Evanston, IL

Postby aruffo » Sun Oct 22, 2006 5:15 pm

I find a similar thing with the single pitches-- when I identify them I try to stay oriented to C-major so I can use my Interval Loaded skills to identify them, but of course this soon fails because I haven't yet gotten to the point of distinguishing between the previous tone heard and the overall key signature (without some orienting chords to help).

But when I hear that A-flat sound, it's like a splash of soothing balm. No worry, no strategizing, no fear, no difficulty. Just.. there it is. That's why I don't worry about whether or not people "use their relative pitch" to identify the tones; you know whether or not you're making relative judgments, and absolute judgments are ultimately easier, so as a person's absolute awareness grows they will willingly switch over to an absolute strategy.


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